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Variation In Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients

VIRGO IN THE NEWS

Smith, M (2010, September 14)

Matters of the Heart: The VIRGO Study


Harris, S (2010, March 25)

Heart study may save young women: Local women can help from WAVY-TV 10


Huston, M (2010, March 7)

Heart attack wake-up call: 'I feel blessed'


Younker, E (2010, February 11)

St. John’s taking part in study of heart disease in young women


Huggins, M (2010, February)

Today’s Charlotte Woman, from New Presby Study Looks At Heart Attacks In At Unstudied Group


Vosburgh, G (2009, November)

The Baylor Heart Hospital in Dallas Mends Women's Broken Hearts from D Magazine


11 February 2009

Cardiologist Richard Staudacher, MD (VIRGO principal investigator at ProHealth Care in Wisconsin) discusses the study as a guest on Milwaukee’s 99.1 WMYX "Wellness Wednesday" segments with Jane & Kidd in the Morning during Heart month.

Podcast 1
Podcast 2


10 May 2008

Podcast

Dr. Harlan Krumholz (VIRGO Principal Investigator) discusses the study as a guest on the Clinician's Roundtable segment of WebMD (XM 157/The Channel for Medical Professionals), hosted by Susan Dolan.


2 May 2008

American Heart Association Meeting Report (PDF)

WEBWIRE - Wednesday, November 28, 2007

Yale Launches Landmark VIRGO Study of Young Women With Heart Disease

New Haven, Conn. — The largest, most comprehensive study of young women with heart attacks—VIRGO (Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes in Young AMI patients)—was recently launched at Yale School of Medicine with a $9.7 million National Institutes of Health grant.

“This is the first study to focus on this high risk—and highly unstudied—group.” said Yale School of Public Health Associate Professor Judith Lichtman, co-principal investigator of the study. “There have been no large, prospective studies of this population, even though the death toll is comparable to that from breast cancer.”

She said the research team is exploring what accounts for premature heart disease in women and why they experience worse outcomes than men of similar age with heart disease.

The four-year grant will support the study of 2,000 women age 55 and younger with 1,000 men for comparison. The multi-site study bridges disciplines from basic biology and clinical sciences to psychology and health services research.

Although women under age 55 with heart attacks represent a small proportion of all patients with heart disease, they account for about 40,000 hospitalizations each year. About 8,000 women under the age of 55 die of heart disease annually, ranking it among the major causes of death in this group. While most women in this age group are protected from heart disease, notes Lichtman, prior research indicates that young women have a much greater risk of dying after a heart attack than men of the same age.

The study addresses questions ranging from genetics and clinical care to outcomes, including: How are outcomes of women different from those of men? What are the genetic, demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral factors that contribute to premature heart disease in women? How do delays in clinical presentation and treatment affect the risk and outcomes of women? Do women get the same quality of care as men?

“Despite the increasing focus on women with heart disease in recent years, we know little about heart disease in this population,” said principal investigator Harlan M. Krumholz, M.D., the Harold H. Hines, Jr. Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology and Public Health at Yale School of Medicine. “Since young women with heart disease are relatively rare at any one hospital, we have assembled an unprecedented network of almost 100 sites nationwide to identify and enroll women for this ground-breaking study.”

The investigators have also developed a novel partnership with the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women, a national movement to raise awareness of heart disease and to empower women to reduce their risk by learning about prevention. The investigators will also collaborate with various other organizations. For more information about VIRGO, e-mail virgo@yale.edu or visit the VIRGO study online.


26 Nov 2007

VIRGO Launch Announcement
VIRGO Welcoming Reception co-hosted with the American Heart Association
at the Scientific Sessions in Orlando, Florida
Dr Lichtman, Juliana Crawford and Elyse Thompson
Dr. Judith Lichtman, VIRGO Co-PI (center), with American Heart Association Issues Marketing Managers Juliana Crawford (left) and Elyse Thompson at the welcoming reception in Orlando on November 5.

Monique Plinck greets guests
Study coordinator Monique Plinck greets guests at the reception.
Dr. Harlan Krumholz
Dr. Harlan Krumholz, VIRGO Co-PI, talks with the group.
Doctors Krumholz and Maggioni
Dr. Harlan Krumholz and Dr. Aldo Maggioni of the Italian Association of Hospital Cardiologists Research Center, Florence.

10 May 2007

Most Young Women Don't Recognize
Heart Attack Warning Signs

Listen to the podcast interview with Dr. Judith Lichtman produced by the American Heart Association for the VIRGO pilot study on symptom presentation in young women.


October 19, 2007

Yale Researchers Launch Landmark Study of Young Women with Heart Disease.

Yale investigators have recently launched the $9.7 million VIRGO study (Variation In Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes in Young AMI Patients), a 4-year effort awarded by the National Institutes of Health to study young women with heart disease. Despite perceptions that young women are protected from heart disease, it is one of the leading causes of death in women 55 years and younger. Building on more than a decade of work studying sex differences in heart disease, this landmark multi-site study will enroll 2,000 young women and 1,000 men for comparison. As the largest, most comprehensive investigation of young women with heart attacks, VIRGO will identify key determinants of recovery and discover knowledge that will assist in improving care in this population.

"Most women in this age group are relatively protected from heart disease; however, prior research indicates that young women have a much greater risk of dying after a heart attack than similarly aged men. This study will be the first to focus on this high risk -- and highly unstudied -- group," said Dr. Judith Lichtman, the co-principal investigator.

Although women under age 55 with heart attacks represent a small proportion of all patients with heart disease, they represent a large group of patients, accounting for approximately 40,000 hospitalizations each year. Approximately 8,000 deaths are annually attributed to ischemic heart disease in young women under 55 years of age, ranking it among the major causes of death in this group. "Despite the increasing focus on women with heart disease in recent years, we know little about heart disease in this population," said Dr. Harlan Krumholz, the principal investigator. "Since young women with heart disease are relatively rare at any one hospital, we have assembled an unprecedented network of almost 100 sites nationwide to identify and enroll women for this ground-breaking study."

VIRGO bridges disciplines from basic biology to clinical sciences to psychology and health services research. "The question is, what accounts for premature heart disease in women and why do they experience worse outcomes than similarly aged men with heart attacks. There have been no large, prospective studies of this population, even though the death toll is comparable to that from breast cancer," said Dr. Lichtman.

The multidisciplinary research team from Yale University School of Medicine, in collaboration with leading investigators from other institutions, will address questions ranging from genetics to clinical care and outcomes, including:

  • How are outcomes of women different from those of men?
  • What are the genetic, demographic, psychosocial, and behavioral factors that contribute to premature heart disease in women?
  • How do delays in clinical presentation and treatment affect the risk and outcomes of women?
  • Do women get the same quality of care as men?

Yale is collaborating with the American Heart Association's Go Red For Women, a nationwide movement to raise awareness of heart disease as the No. 1 killer of women and empower women to reduce their risk by learning about prevention. The investigators will be working closely with the American Heart Association to disseminate study findings through various channels, including online at the American Heart Association's website, GoRedForWomen.org, and will also distribute information through the American College of Cardiology. For more information about Go Red For Women, please call 1-888-MY-HEART (1-888-694-3278) or visit GoRedForWomen.org. Public sharing of this information will drive efforts to improve the prevention, care and outcomes for young women and men who experience a heart attack.


For more information about VIRGO, email: virgo@yale.edu.

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