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Variation In Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients

VIRGO Project Enrolled Participants

Current Newsletter - VIRGO At Heart

NEWSLETTER ARCHIVES

Dr Harlan Krumholz
"My hope for VIRGO is that our efforts will produce information, to make a difference in the lives of young people who suffer from heart disease"
- Dr Harlan Krumholz

60 Seconds with Researcher Dr. Harlan Krumholz

I am interested in heart research because heart disease is the most common cause of death and disability in the U.S. and I am trying to look at big health problems. My training focused on heart disease, and gave me the chance to work with people on preventing heart disease, on acute treatment when they were in the throes of life-threatening illness, quick diagnoses and a speedy response were needed along with chronic care as they coped with the challenges of a condition that could not be cured.

Risk Factors - High Blood Pressure

One in three U.S. adults has high blood pressure, but 39% of them are not receiving treatment to reduce these risks.1

Learn more about heart disease by recognizing risk factors. Many people have no idea they have high blood pressure. Your chances of having high blood pressure increase as you get older. Over time, high blood pressure hardens blood vessels making it harder for blood to squeeze through. The good news is that itís treatable. To learn more about valuable prevention and treatment information on risk factors like high blood pressure, visit www.virgostudy.org.

Risk Factors - High Blood Cholesterol

About half of American adults have cholesterol levels that are too high. You should have your cholesterol levels checked regularly (at least once every five years starting at age 20).2

Learn more about heart disease by recognizing risk factors. High blood cholesterol can contribute to 'clogging' of the blood vessels supplying the heart, brain and other parts of the body. Some people may need medication to lower their blood cholesterol levels as well as making lifestyle changes so it is important to have your cholesterol levels checked regularly. Ask your doctor about lifestyle changes that will help to lower blood cholesterol levels like choosing foods low in saturated fat and cholesterol and enjoying at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most or all days of the week. To learn more about valuable prevention and treatment information on risk factors like high blood cholesterol, visit www.goredforwomen.org.

  1. American Heart Association, Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2008 Update. Dallas, Texas: American Heart Association; 2008 [Accessed 9 December 2009]
  2. Go Red for Women High Blood Cholesterol and Triglycerides Fact Sheet. Available at www.goredforwomen.org [Accessed 24 August 2010]

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